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  • The Tragic Code of the "Child of the Sea God"

    Troy is a character from Suikoden IV, and one of the characters I was most impressed by as a kid. In a way, he is the ultimate anti-villain -- being a villain only because he was on the enemy faction and none more. Even when the main antagonist of the game committed genocide against an innocent island nation, that even had his own minions there, Troy was the only one in the enemy faction to actually protest against the terrible weapon which was used. Although portrayed as the key enemy of the game, he is rarely seen throughout the game, because he is merely a pawn of a greater scheme and is only mentioned due to him being a main character, and an excellent soldier and admiral. Despite his good nature, he followed a code of loyalty to his nation until his death. He is only encountered twice in the game, and arguably he is the only enemy in the entire game who was willing to spare you, the hero. The allies that you happen to fight, do not count, even when faced as opponents. In fact, the main reason I'm even bringing this obscure villain up is not because of my adoration of him, but because of how he sees death and killing. For "Sir Troy", defeat through death is something honourable, worthy only to opponents, strong enough to face him and remain formidable. The only reason the game is beaten, is because he chose to spare the hero (canonically named Razro) and his companions, when he could've killed them all, here and there. His reason for this decision was, because "The sea will decide their fate" (the game is mostly naval, set around a group of islands). There was nothing stopping him, but his own philosophy. No external resistance, no disobeying soldiers – only him and "the sea". Apperently, he was so renowned among his nation, he was considered a war hero, and has been granted a peculiar title -- "Child of the Sea God". Who is that "Sea God" entity is unknown, and yet even those who only heard of Troy, knew him of that title. Saying to his henchmen that "The sea will decide their fate", when sparing his enemies, raise a somewhat-religious tone, as if the entire sea is a living entity, a god. Nonetheless, he dislikes being called the very title he was honoured with. The "Sea God", like with Troy, has spared the protagonist team, and because of that they eventually managed to build an opposition force, strong enough to defeat the main villain and Troy himself. That also applies to their fleets which were decimated. The first fight with Troy is the only fight in the game where you are supposed to lose. In some games, you can beat "unbeatable" battles through mostly cheating, but in this game, Troy is the only enemy who, at the time, has infinite health, meaning he cannot be defeated even if you tried. I believe this symbolizes the fact that you are currently extremely weak against him, and therefore, too unworthy to be killed by him. As you can see, this code of honour backfires against him and he accepts it with complete grace. The game's final fight is with him once more. This time, you're fighting against him in his sinking ship, which he sailed as a last man stand. Even when his entire fleet under the sea, and his castle decimated, he seems to be untouched by these facts, which could frustrate many other warlords and the like. This time you're supposed to win. When defeated, the hero returns to his ship. Then, you are given a final decision -- accept his death or ask him to join you. This is a very dramatic decision, and yet, it won't change anything. Even if you ask him to join, he will refuse, for he is a man who knows to accept victory the same as he can accept defeat -- even if it's his death. A true warrior; a naval samurai. Lives by the blade, dies by the blade. Beyond opposition to the island-destroying weapon mentioned earlier, he shows no regret, no protest. If "the sea" or his nation dictates it, he will live, or he will die. With his undying loyalty, he serves and accepts his role as a mere pawn, despite his greatness. I was told once by my former master that Socrates used to invent gods when he philosophized, which frustrated the public and the Athenian government. Troy very much reminds me of that eccentric philosopher, being a "ying" to his "yang" in a way. To both, their lives did not matter, for they served a purpose greater than them; a purpose worth dying for, if reality dictates so. For Socrates it was philosophizing; for Troy it was war. Ultimately, both died because of their loyalty to the State. Both could've been redeemed, but both refused without protest. As I contemplate about that obscure game from Japan, with an inaccessible title to the rest of the world, I find myself more and more relating between it and myself. That is why I mention it so much in my articles, even though many who played it would say it is a very bad game, or at least mediocre. And yet, it has been haunting my dreams throughout my life, beginning from elementary school until adulthood, even when I've stopped playing it for years. For some reason, this "very bad" game appears to teach me a lot. About life, about myself. It made me despise disposability, appreciate the little details, be naive, and strive to be friendly and good. When thinking about that game, it seems that there was only one truly evil villain, while the rest of them were eventually converted to good. One was a coward, the other, a naive fool. A third, an atoner, and the fourth, a wise old man, his son -- a sceptic of command. The "ultimate" villain, the last one whom you need to defeat in order to beat the game, technically kills himself by letting his ship sink, losing himself to the depths of the ocean. Every character in that game appears to have a justification for their villainy or naughtiness, making them not as evil as they seem. Only one, a backstabbing manipulator, is the only one worthy of being called evil. Perhaps because of that whole experience, I find it extremely difficult to see the evil in people. Even when I am told that they are evil, even my own haters, I still try to reason their motives, as if they were characters from that game. When I realize there are at least 3 types of moral evil -- Chaotic, Neutral and Lawful, I still can't truly comprehend the concept of evil as something to be condemned, without paying full attention to a justifying motive or goal. In the end, I learned from Troy the worth of being loyal to a philosophy. He is a self-respecting warrior. He was defeated. Therefore, he must die. Some may call him a fool, for he was given a generous chance of redemption, but he refused it, and that refusal is better than a lifetime of betraying his code; the code of the "Sea God". Playing so much of this game through childhood, I eventually began speaking and expressing myself with its language by default, inevitably. People called me a robot, a pretender, a bullsh*tter and a condescending man as a result of that, but in the end, all I did was remaining true to my word, as did Sir Troy. When told that the matter has been settled, he says:

  • "Punishing the Unfortunate" Fallacy -- Why Full Refraining Doesn't Always Work

    During one of my journeys through videos online I encountered an interesting suggestion: "If you are sensitive, don't use the internet!". This makes one wonder, how much does one have to restrict themselves, just to avoid any kind of disturbance in this world, just because they have a liability, which could cause such disturbance? In other words, if you're epileptic, does it mean you should avoid watching videos, just because not every video creator puts an epilepsy warning before each trigger? This series of questions I asked myself to have also occurred when I watched a certain video where, in the end, there was an auditory overload; a short duration where there was intensive music and screams. Of course, I couldn't have predicted that, because the video was a movie review. I can't just expect, as an autistic person, that every movie review will have a sensory overload session in their final part, right? Does it mean that I shouldn't watch movie reviews, or videos in general? In one other example, I was on a walk in a public place, while someone indirectly screamed in my ear from an opposite direction; they were probably calling for someone and I just so happened to be in that unfortunate, specific positioning. Does it mean I should refrain from taking hikes, just because any random stranger could scream near me, to people that are away from a talking distance? That, you see, is what I call the "Punishing the Unfortunate" Fallacy -- The calling to confine the more unfortunate members of society to a smaller area of living (not necessarily a physical space), just because of their unfortunate traits. Sensitive people, you see, do not choose to be sensitive, and it's not something you can decrease by ordering them to be "less dramatic" or "be less of a chicken" or whatever. It is for a fact that some people act more dramatically to things than other people, and it is for a fact that not all do so by will. To be not sensitive, in a way, is a privilege not all possess. It opens for you more job opportunities, such as in reception and telemarketing (where you must talk to strangers); It makes you more immune to insults and so on. In the end, if you happen to be sensitive like me, the inevitable fact is that you too are sharing a place in the world, just like the rest of humanity. Some populations are denser, some are smaller and more isolated, but ultimately, unless you're a complete hermit, being in whatever kind of an interpersonal forum is inevitable. Therefore, calling for a major isolation to someone, such as not being online, is not only unjustified but also ineffective. Of course, there are ways where refraining from certain things works. Using the epilepsy example -- it's probably a good idea to not watch a video with an epilepsy warning if you have that unfortunate condition, but it doesn't mean you should avoid any kind of online media or T.V. Even alongside unfortunate conditions and disabilities, even in the absence of a specifically related warning, it's preferable that you live life as much as you can, despite of said warnings and conditions -- EVEN if it means that there will be a risk at hand. And still, you can't expect every risk to be worth it, when the stakes are too high. I myself like video games but would not play stressful games if it means it would be bad for my mental health. After all, I play them for fun, for rejuvenation; not to gamble away my mental health. Is it worthy to trade wellbeing for fun? Of course, refraining completely from gaming, would mean that I will be punishing myself for something specific that doesn't exist in the entirety of the field. Likewise, the sensitive shouldn't refrain from using the internet just because there are some insensitive people or insensitive content hidden in its corners. This fallacy applies when people -- or even yourself -- mistake you for a person with a wheelchair that cannot access buildings with just stairs. Not every person with something unfortunate has something so unfortunate that should make them completely abstain from something, they too deserve -- like a "normal" person without said "something". For example, the fact that I have autism and am sensitive to sound, doesn't mean I should be deaf or refrain from watching anything with sound. It isn't in the same weight as a person who uses a wheelchair and needs ramps to access buildings (or other kinds of accessibilities for that matter). Thus, autistic people shouldn't completely isolate themselves from audio in general, just because specific audio makes their life difficult. That would be, therefore, punishing the unfortunate, regardless of the goodness of maliciousness of the intention used. I myself am a hermit, ironically as it may sound, and I recently became even more of a hermit after cutting ties with an entire branch of my family. However, I do not let my autism get in the way of my ambition to be a writer and philosophize publicly using the internet. The internet has brought me benefit as it brought me harm. The fact that there is harm in the internet, shouldn't make one give up the entirety of its benefit to the individual, to societies and to mankind. It is, in a way, one of the few true places where you can express yourself with minimal worry for retribution (depending, of course, which platform you use, and whether it is a public or private domain). Even in a democracy, you see, you can suffer consequences for expressing yourself -- violence, arrest, harassment, being fired from your job and so on. Democracy is pretty much a spectrum than a specific definition, because even in the democratic world there are more democratic countries than others, whether if it's through law, culture or both. She... Ms. Chen, punished me through disconnection because I spoke too freely of emotion. It only happened twice because I hoped she has matured in the second time. She will pay by realizing the worth of two things -- sheer honesty, and the fault of her false assumption, of me as irrelevant. Even people under my specific condition can be relevant; even philosophers can be relevant in today's world. I will not let the embargo of her non-presence defeat my ambition for greater success.

  • On Disconnecting From Family

    Death, divorce and other forms of separation -- some say that one of the most important values in human existence is the value of family. Some say it is because we are social animals; others may claim that, because we come from a certain source, we should honour it, or at least be thankful for its existence; for its contribution in making us the people we are today. Today on my personal life, which I won't detail too much this time, I've decided to disconnect from an entire branch of family, because of a pattern I have found in them. Of course, I will not name them, for I respect the privacy of those who provide no consent. They were and are, in a way, tyrant-like people, who are mostly nice as long as you don't say legitimate things to them that might trigger them into yelling at you. I too, unfortunately, possess some of that psychology, and it is one of the many reasons why I aspire to at least partially isolate myself from this world. It is also one of the reasons why I don't want kids, because even if I actually wanted them, I would still prevent myself from having them. I wish not to pass on these cursed genetics who's some of them I've been given. Passing them on, could lead to a life of suffering, as I myself have experienced. You see, for many, one of the decisions one must make is what to do with their family after they've reached adulthood. In some places, academics, the military and other ventures, may require the individual to keep a large distance from their family, like some would from their friends from school after graduation. For some it is inevitable because, as they say, "duty calls". Realism dictates that for many, you cannot have everything you want, simply because that is idealism, which is the opposite of realism. However, I am an idealist, at least in this department. What's in a life, if not lived according to one's ideals, at least eventually? Must we be slaves to things we don't want to be slaves to, just because of what other people say, what society and the norms say you should live? Must we be slaves to our local culture and their vision of what a life well lived is? In some parts of Jewish communities, you must have kids, because it says so in the Old Testament; a direct command from a universal designer. Of course we need kids to preserve our species, but is it truly a commitment everyone should have? In the grand scheme of things, you, I and our descendants don't really matter unless we make it into history, and even then we might be in a minor role of it. I am aware that, by refusing to have kids, I am cutting an entire line of descendants. However, like hair, other "lines" will take their place, their seats in the classroom and their concrete apartment. But I digress, merely a presentation of an example. What I'm trying to convey is, that not everyone is compatible with other people, even if they are your very own flesh and blood. That is true especially when you live with them or have a close connection with them. My mother cut her ties with her father after he called me a moron when I was a child. Surely the sacred value of family shouldn't justify such abuse, correct? Likewise, the adult should not be obligated to give any justification to anyone when cutting ties with people that bring him or her unnecessary suffering. The very specific branch I was talking about at the beginning -- they used to scream at me for saying legitimate stuff, like raising a question or giving a simple request. One time, as a kid, when I refused to do something, I was dragged out from the family member's car. And yet, I am supposed to appreciate that branch's existence in my life, despite the things they've inflicted on me, even at times when I had no ill will in mind. As an adult, you have the chance to disconnect from just about anyone who you can do so. Some of these disconnections might lead to regret, and other to relief, and sometimes even both. What you should have in mind is, that realism does not justify unnecessary suffering, when you can have a pathway to a life of better comfort, benefit and/or happiness. No one toxic should be kept in your life just because they are nice and polite and "are very good to guests". In the end, for many, living with others s*cks, and that's one of the many reasons why I lead a life of solitude and abstinence. Once you solve the issue of loneliness and embrace solitude, life could indeed get a lot easier and less stressful. This is why I don't regret, at least for now, to disconnect from an entire branch of family; a major one, at that. No further details will be given. ...I am at least grateful for this to give me another possibility to write. Those without problems might have less inspiration than those who do.

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  • Tomasio Rubinshtein's Official Website

    Philosocom Philosophical Contemplations & Insights by Mr. T. A. Rubinshtein Over 570 free original articles Rate Philosocom While you browse... --------- Site Anthem Nir Forrai & Reuven Hayun 00:00 / 03:09 Choose Your Destiny... All Posts Featured Poetry Personal Wisdom Solitude Society Videos Love Serenity Rubnshteinc Odd/Other Philosopher Reccomends Sep 12, 2021 2 min The "Why" of Philosocom (PIN) Background music: Why would a person declare To dedicate his entire life, To a single website? There is a problem, you see. Problem not... 84 views 2 comments 7 likes. Post not marked as liked 7 Sep 11, 2021 2 min A Brief Description of Mr. T. A. R. For Newcomers (PIN) Tom “Tomasio” Avichen Rubinshtein was born on the 7th of December 1997 and has been living in Israel for all his life. In 2011 he was... 91 views 2 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Sep 24, 2020 4 min How to Find Purpose (PIN) The world today is a very non-purpose-focused place to live and act in. We may interact with our families, commit to our jobs and do... 344 views 1 comment 8 likes. Post not marked as liked 8 2 days ago 3 min On the Path of Philosophership -- The Importance of Inclusion I have recently heard of a claim, that there are less geniuses nowadays; that either this is true or that there less KNOWN geniuses,... 5 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 2 days ago 4 min The Underestimating Trio (Video and Post-Commentary) VIDEO SUBTITLES: Apathy, detest, and everything that rejects These were the ingredients that have collided To be sent away by the perfect... 6 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 4 days ago 5 min Recognition of "Force" -- The Philosophy of Razor Reapkvar In this fine evening I'd like to tell you the story of a fictional character I created in a Dungeons and Dragons-esque game, whose story... 3 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 5 days ago 5 min Evil In Humanity It was only recently when I realized that there is a very thick connection between evil and self-interest. The more you put yourself... 7 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 6 days ago 3 min On "The Greater Good" Is it rational to believe that every event, since the dawn of mankind, has been made for the greater good of mankind? The wars, the... 11 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 7 days ago 4 min Profession Versus Occupation -- The Thin Line Although they are often used synonymously, including in my own native language, there is a thin difference between profession and... 5 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Jan 10 3 min A Relevant Existence (Translated Poem) Written to Ms. Chen in mind, the one whom I feel the urge to prove; an unwanted muse; a thorn in my mind's side, degrading my existence... 3 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Jan 8 3 min Justice In Love Do you think there is justice in love? If so, how come? We humans need to be loved by a minimum extant, but we sure don't DESERVE to be... 6 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Jan 7 3 min The Wayless Truth What is a "Wayless Truth"? It is a special kind of truth that is encountered without the need for further contemplation or research. In... 15 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Jan 2 4 min The "Wizard" and the "Sorcerer" Factions In Philosophy In English, or at least in Role-Playing games, the terms "wizard" and "sorcerer" may sound synonymous, while in fact they are very... 5 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Jan 1 6 min Distance In Honour Throughout my life I've received much respect for my craft and the role I have given to myself, but only rarely I got to experience love... 8 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 31, 2021 4 min On The Path of Philosophership -- Recognition In a way, a philosopher is like an emperor of a vast, disorganized land of mixed populations; for them to recognize your position and... 6 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 30, 2021 5 min Noise, Democracy and Seclusion It is plausible to assume that in a large area, where the density is large as well, there will be plenty of people living near each... 10 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Dec 29, 2021 7 min The Philosopher's Trap -- The Delusion of the Universal Much of what we see as objective is but a widely accepted subjectivity. From norms to rules to tradition to laws -- much of what we see... 18 views 1 comment 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 29, 2021 2 min A Philosopher's Melancholy (Based on the Chilean song's melody, "Mi General, Augusto Pinochet". Nothing in this poem is associated with the mentioned individual in... 8 views 0 comments 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Dec 28, 2021 3 min When Giving Up is Good I have been suffering from over-body-fat for many years, no matter how much physically active I was. I actively searched ways to lose... 9 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 27, 2021 4 min Depth In Simplicity -- Insights From Coin Tossing During my times as a child, there was a mini-game in one of my favorite video games -- a coin toss game, and the music theme that... 9 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 24, 2021 4 min The Essence of Loyalty Loyalty is the most important resource anyone could possibly have, and not only philosophers or any other kind of content creator -- but... 5 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 22, 2021 4 min The Devil's Mark Dilemma In a movie I watched recently, called "The New World Order: The End Has Come", there is this interesting dilemma which all of mankind has... 7 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Dec 22, 2021 1 min The Sore Eye Rune; Punishment Inverted (Poem) Most of my days were spent Wasting the fluid of my eyes away. They have seen much, much have went, On creation and consumption, Of being... 5 views 0 comments Post not marked as liked Dec 21, 2021 6 min Furthermore on Death (And Reincarnation) As you've probably read thus far, I have a large affinity with death, not because I'm suicidal, but because I view death from the point... 6 views 0 comments 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 1 2 3 4 5 January 2022 (11) 11 posts December 2021 (30) 30 posts November 2021 (22) 22 posts October 2021 (31) 31 posts September 2021 (22) 22 posts August 2021 (19) 19 posts July 2021 (18) 18 posts June 2021 (21) 21 posts May 2021 (21) 21 posts April 2021 (22) 22 posts March 2021 (16) 16 posts February 2021 (16) 16 posts January 2021 (22) 22 posts December 2020 (17) 17 posts November 2020 (15) 15 posts October 2020 (10) 10 posts September 2020 (10) 10 posts August 2020 (13) 13 posts July 2020 (8) 8 posts June 2020 (8) 8 posts May 2020 (8) 8 posts April 2020 (13) 13 posts March 2020 (15) 15 posts February 2020 (11) 11 posts Intermission Popular Articles Universality of Truth (Poem) 99 0 7 likes. Post not marked as liked 7 Guide to the Philosophy Blogger 92 0 8 likes. Post not marked as liked 8 Life as an Exhausted Man 173 0 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 The 4 Horrors of Time Travel 211 0 3 likes. Post not marked as liked 3 The Problem With Time 322 0 7 likes. Post not marked as liked 7 The Drained One -- a Poem 412 3 22 likes. Post not marked as liked 22 Why You Shouldn't Murder 152 2 9 likes. Post not marked as liked 9 Climbing the Bias-Breaker Hill 197 0 8 likes. Post not marked as liked 8 Zeno's Paradox and the Infinity of Everything 222 0 3 likes. Post not marked as liked 3 Solitarus -- The Love of Solitude (Translated Article) 421 0 20 likes. Post not marked as liked 20 3 Philosophical Questions We Should Ask Ourselves Regularly 855 0 5 likes. Post not marked as liked 5 The Potential Purposes of Solitude 125 0 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Tomasio A. Rubinshtein Philosocom's Writer I am a philosopher from Israel, author of several books in 2 languages, and Quora's Top Writer of the year 2018. I'm also a semi-hermit who has decided to dedicate his life to writing and sharing my articles across the globe. Several podcasts on me, as well as an interview, have been made since my career as a writer. More information about me can be found here . People Who Enjoyed My Writings Number #1 Testimonial A Tanzanian Teacher "My students are proud of you and they feel deeply & utterly enlightened!" A Long-Time Reader From India "Sir, Thanks so much. You indeed are a master philosopher." A Fan "Philosocom is an absolute gem. Thank you for your insights" ​ A Quora Reader "Thank you for that introspective and interesting share." A Canadian Caligraphist "Thank you for your feedback, I appreciate reading your articles" "If anyone told my story, he will tell that in my life I have been privileged to walk alongside who is without any doubt from the giants of philosophy from Socrates to Martha Nussbaum." -- Daniel Antonio Paez, Musician and Former Classmate

  • Mr. Tomasio Rubinshtein -- Philosocom

    About the Philosopher "Even if you’ll try to bring down my spirit, I will rarely despair as I have decided to put my very own life at stake. Therefore, there is only room for improvement, or there is death. Since I don't want to die, I will resume my craft" ​ -- Rubinshtein on adversity. "Tomasio is a great philosopher we can all relate to" ​ -- Michelle Contreras Ewans, writer and researcher. "I see in you a beacon of hope for the distressed. Your courage, perseverance & fortitude is a shining example for those who fail to see light at the end of the tunnel. The Sun always shone after the dark night!! I wish you to worship the Sun which as Khalil Gibran said is the Eye of God in the sky. In the beginning all religions admit there was nothing. Hence they started worshipping nature & transformed into symbols of strength." ​ -- Dr. S. K. Pachauri, scholar. Tomasio A. Rubinshtein is an Israeli philosopher and writer. Born in the 90's of the previous centuries, he wrote many books, mostly of philosophical nature, starting from the age of 15. He is primarily known from his participation on Quora, where he answered questions of people across the globe. A lot of his English content is a product of his voluntary services to this respected site, where was also declared one of the site's Top Writers for 2018. ​ Rubinshtein has written and published 7 books in Hebrew and English, mainly on the topic of philosophy, with the last published book being a collection of a few short stories and poetry. All can be bought as E-books in his E-bookstore on PayHip (the link will be at the bottom of this description).​ ​ A firm believer of individuality, he resigned from his academic studies, and chose to go his own way as an independent philosopher, believing that one doesn't need an academic degree in order to be a philosopher, giving Socrates, Diogenes and Nietzsche as examples. ​ In April 2019 he founded Philosocom, a site dedicated to many of his articles, which he updates on a regular basis to this day (2022). ​ Regarding his education, he has fully graduated highschool and attended a few courses in philosophy at the Israeli Open University. In addition, he has won 3rd place in a local writing contest for high school students and have reached the finals of an English speech competition at Jerusalem. In addition, he is dedicated to completing a lot of courses on Udemy, to the point he sees it as a hobby of his. ​ Rubinshtein has also been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome at the age of 13 and served at the Israeli National Service for a year. ​ In 2019, Rubinshtein managed a community on the Quora website, composed of dozens of thousands of followers, dedicated to the sharing of insightful content. Although it is now disbanded, many people appreciated his initiative. ​ If you have any questions to ask Mr. Rubinshtein, become a member by using the log-in feature at the header above and you'll have the option to contact him by the blog's comment section. At the bottom of each page there is his social media addresses. There is also a forum you can use to contact Rubinshtein publicly, but it also requires signing in. ​ Tomasio Rubinshtein's purpose in life is simple -- to contribute to the world in his own way, and that way is a path of solitude, contemplation and follower-gaining. Regardless of his disabilities preventing him from having a job, he still has a great desire to serve the world in a way which he sees as meaningful and productive. Hence the existence of this very site. * Buy his books today by going to his digital bookstore . You can also donate if desired. ​ Full Name: Tom "Tomasio" Avichen Rubinshtein ​ Alias: Mr. Rubinshtein, Thomasio, T.A.R, Master Tomasio (by some). Day of Birth: December 7th, 1997 Languages: Hebrew and English ​ ​ Occupation: Writer, Philosopher (non-academic), Small-time Admin, former University Student, Website Owner, former National Service Clerk, Tarot Master. ​ Powers/Skills: Writing Skills, Speech-giving, Capable of being alone for long periods of time. Video-recording, Staying extensively awake, High dedication and deep thinking capability. ​ Weaknesses: Anxiety, Audio Sensitivity and Chronic Fatigue ​ Hobbies: Relaxing, learning about new things, finding new music, thinking about the next article, drinking coffee, playing with Tarot cards and vexillology . ​ Goals: Write as much as possible before death, leave a legacy, expand his content’s exposure, finding true peace, reach true fulfilment and contribute to the world in his own way and be worthy and relevant to his followers & readers. ​ Type of Thinker: Free-Thinking Rationalist ​ Type of Person: Peace-seeking Semi-Hermit ​ Online Certificates: Blogging Certificate Philosophical Thinking Certificate Martial Art Philosophy Certificate Writing Course Certificate Phenomenology Certificate Eastern Philosophy Certificate Inner Peace Course Certificate Confidence Master Course Certificate Advanced Philosophy of Education Certificate Fallacies in Logic Course Certificate Authority Blogger Certificate Bushido Philosophy Certificate Arcane Education Tarot Mysticism Kabbalah (Intermediate) Tarot Mastery Numerology Rubinshtein's Portfolio: Introductory Video Featured Articles The "Why" of Philosocom (PIN) 84 2 7 likes. Post not marked as liked 7 Redemption By Succession; Magnum Opus of 2021 16 1 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 The Philosophy of Numbers and Meanings 45 0 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Thoughts On the Infinity 42 0 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 How to Become a Philosopher -- Philosophy as Art and Science 53 0 3 likes. Post not marked as liked 3 The "42" Anecdote (Or, Words Versus Numbers). 56 0 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 The Attempt to Redeem Subjectivity 78 0 4 likes. Post not marked as liked 4 Guide to the Philosophy Blogger 92 0 8 likes. Post not marked as liked 8 The English Language 110 0 2 likes. Post not marked as liked 2 Rationality And Time 206 0 6 likes. Post not marked as liked 6 Thoughts On The Universality of Existence 255 0 5 likes. Post not marked as liked 5 Valentine's Day and Undesired Uniqueness 188 0 4 likes. Post not marked as liked 4 The Attack on Philosophical Exploration 152 0 8 likes. Post not marked as liked 8 The Long-Term Question 165 0 5 likes. Post not marked as liked 5 The Problem With Time 322 0 7 likes. Post not marked as liked 7 The Rubinshteinic Strategy to Living 122 0 6 likes. Post not marked as liked 6

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